How Do I Find My Assignment Availability Code 37

Health Care/Special Needs

Military treatment facilities

The clinics and services available at military treatment facilities vary by location. Before you move, identify the military treatment facility that will serve you, visit its website to learn about the services available and get contact information.

Moving to a new TRICARE region

If you anticipate a move to another TRICARE region, work with your local TRICARE service center or case manager before your move to ensure the transition is as smooth as possible. On arrival at the new duty location, you or your sponsor should contact the beneficiary counseling and assistance coordinator or the TRICARE service center to ensure the transition plans are in place and to obtain authorizations for TRICARE Extended Care Health Option services, if applicable.

Beneficiary counseling and assistance coordinator

All TRICARE regional offices and most military treatment facilities are staffed with beneficiary counseling and assistance coordinators. They provide information, guidance and assistance on benefit options, TRICARE Prime enrollment, special authorizations, status of claims, eligibility and assistance with referrals and appointments. If you or your family member has more severe needs, contact your TRICARE case manager.

Case management

Case management involves a team of health care professionals who help you and your family find solutions to complex health problems. It is important to inform your case manager if you are moving as he or she will connect you with the case manager at your new location.

Extended Care Health Option

The Extended Care Health Option provides financial assistance to beneficiaries of active-duty service members who qualify based on specific mental or physical disabilities. The Extended Care Health Option offers an integrated set of services and supplies beyond the basic TRICARE program. Regional contractors in each of the TRICARE regions and overseas administer the program.

Transporting medical equipment

Contact your installation’s household goods/transportation office for information on special procedures for the transportation of medical equipment.

Federal and state health care programs

Medicaid provides health coverage for individuals and families with low incomes or have a disability. The department of social services or the department of medical assistance may administer the Medicaid program in your state. Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is a cash assistance program intended to meet basic needs for disabled adults and children who have limited resources. Families must reapply after moving to a new state.

Many states offer services for children with special health care needs funded by the Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, or Title V. State departments of health websites and local health departments can provide information on state health benefits. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau website has more information, including state points of contact.

Other important resources

TRICARE debt collection assistance officers assigned to regional offices and military treatment facilities worldwide can help beneficiaries understand and get assistance with debt collection issues related to TRICARE.

Installation Specific Information

Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)

Overseas Medical Screening --  All military personnel with assignment instructions for outside the continental United States who elect to serve the accompanied tour must have family members medically and educationally screened and, if required, enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP). This process should be completed  as early as 6 months prior to the report no later than date (RNLTD) and not later than 30 days before RNLTD Identification during overseas medical screening can result in a delay of approval for the family member travel if the family member has an exceptional medical or educational need and has not previously been enrolled in EFMP. The Air Force EFMP program ensures members are assigned where family members with exceptional needs can receive services required.

EFMP is a program specifically designed to ensure service availability for family members of active duty military in event of a PCS, to assist families with relocation when a medical (or special education) condition exists and services are not available at the current or projected location and to assist families with finding resources on base and in the community.  Active duty sponsors are given an assignment limitation code Q (Q-Code) to identify their families enrollment in the EFMP program.

A medical exceptional need is one that requires specialized care (urology, neurology, psychiatry, developmental pediatrics, etc.) for an ongoing chronic illness.

An educational exceptional need is one which requires special educational services in order to progress academically. These services are identified on an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and may include resource room, psychological services, occupational or physical therapy, etc.

Enrollment is mandatory for all active duty military personnel who have a family member with an exceptional need.

Your EFMP status is processed through the Military Personnel Flight at your current assignment.  Likewise, the overseas medical clearance paperwork is processed through the Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) at your current assignment.   It is your MTF’s responsibility at your current assignment to contact your gaining unit to ensure EFMP service availability. 

Overseas Medical Screening --  All military personnel with assignment instructions for outside the continental United States who elect to serve the accompanied tour must have family members medically and educationally screened and, if required, enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP). This process should be completed  as early as 6 months prior to the report no later than date (RNLTD) and not later than 30 days before RNLTD Identification during overseas medical screening can result in a delay of approval for the family member travel if the family member has an exceptional medical or educational need and has not previously been enrolled in EFMP. The Air Force EFMP program ensures members are assigned where family members with exceptional needs can receive services required.

EFMP is a program specifically designed to ensure service availability for family members of active duty military in event of a PCS, to assist families with relocation when a medical (or special education) condition exists and services are not available at the current or projected location and to assist families with finding resources on base and in the community.  Active duty sponsors are given an assignment limitation code Q (Q-Code) to identify their families enrollment in the EFMP program.

A medical exceptional need is one that requires specialized care (urology, neurology, psychiatry, developmental pediatrics, etc.) for an ongoing chronic illness.

An educational exceptional need is one which requires special educational services in order to progress academically. These services are identified on an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and may include resource room, psychological services, occupational or physical therapy, etc.

Enrollment is mandatory for all active duty military personnel who have a family member with an exceptional need.

Your EFMP status is processed through the Military Personnel Flight at your current assignment.  Likewise, the overseas medical clearance paperwork is processed through the Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) at your current assignment.   It is your MTF’s responsibility at your current assignment to contact your gaining unit to ensure EFMP service availability.


Associated Links

TRICARE
Find out everything you need to know about your medical benefits.

Beneficiary Counseling Assistance Coordinator
A BCAC educates beneficiaries, and enhances a thorough understanding of TRICARE programs.

TRICARE Mobile App for Pharmacy Assistance
Check prescriptions status; order home delivery; find a pharmacy and more all from your phone. You must be registered before downloading the mobile app.

  1. 06-06-2014, 08:22 PM#1
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    Facing MEB - Advice

    I received an assignment at the beginning of May with a RNLTD of mid-Aug. While trying to get my medical clearance, I was notified that I was placed on a 365 day world-wide disqualification. When my PCM reviewed my records, he determined that I have a condition that makes me "unfit for active duty". I was advised to request a RNLTD extension, which was approved. It appears that my medical clearance must go to my gaining base for approval and then to AFPC for approval. I'm skeptical that my medical clearance will be approved by Sept.

    Question #1 - Has anyone experienced this? Do you get the assignment?

    I was also told that I would be facing an Initial Review in Leiu of MEB(IRILO) regardless of whether or not I was approved for the assignment. In other words, the IRILO will happen either way. Public Health told me that I would likely be facing a full MEB.

    I'm a MSgt over 15 yrs of service.

    Question #2 - How long is this process going to take?

    #3 - Will I be medically retired?
    #3A - What will my retirement pay be based on? High 3? Final pay?

    #4 - Any other advice or comments about MEB? Should I go to TAPS just to be safe?

    Thanks.

    #4 -
    Originally Posted by Capt Alfredo
    Rules for the sake of rules makes for mindless policy and engenders a lack of respect for those who enact and enforce them.

  2. 06-07-2014, 09:50 PM#2
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    This advice is the same that sooooooo many MSgts love to spout and I would hazard a guess you have to..."have you asked your supervisor". Are you going overseas or CONUS. Some overseas bases arent able to deal with more than the common infection or broken bone. Go for the medical retirement. They are trying to get rid of people so a condition that makes you unfit for active duty doesnt bode well. There is a big wide world out there. Get in to it!
    Originally Posted by fufu
    I received an assignment at the beginning of May with a RNLTD of mid-Aug. While trying to get my medical clearance, I was notified that I was placed on a 365 day world-wide disqualification. When my PCM reviewed my records, he determined that I have a condition that makes me "unfit for active duty". I was advised to request a RNLTD extension, which was approved. It appears that my medical clearance must go to my gaining base for approval and then to AFPC for approval. I'm skeptical that my medical clearance will be approved by Sept.

    Question #1 - Has anyone experienced this? Do you get the assignment?

    I was also told that I would be facing an Initial Review in Leiu of MEB(IRILO) regardless of whether or not I was approved for the assignment. In other words, the IRILO will happen either way. Public Health told me that I would likely be facing a full MEB.

    I'm a MSgt over 15 yrs of service.

    Question #2 - How long is this process going to take?

    #3 - Will I be medically retired?
    #3A - What will my retirement pay be based on? High 3? Final pay?

    #4 - Any other advice or comments about MEB? Should I go to TAPS just to be safe?

    Thanks.

    #4 -

  3. 06-09-2014, 07:23 AM#3
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    What's the condition? Its really difficult to gauge what your facing MEB wise without knowing the problem.
    Originally Posted by fufu
    I received an assignment at the beginning of May with a RNLTD of mid-Aug. While trying to get my medical clearance, I was notified that I was placed on a 365 day world-wide disqualification. When my PCM reviewed my records, he determined that I have a condition that makes me "unfit for active duty". I was advised to request a RNLTD extension, which was approved. It appears that my medical clearance must go to my gaining base for approval and then to AFPC for approval. I'm skeptical that my medical clearance will be approved by Sept.

    Question #1 - Has anyone experienced this? Do you get the assignment?

    I was also told that I would be facing an Initial Review in Leiu of MEB(IRILO) regardless of whether or not I was approved for the assignment. In other words, the IRILO will happen either way. Public Health told me that I would likely be facing a full MEB.

    I'm a MSgt over 15 yrs of service.

    Question #2 - How long is this process going to take?

    #3 - Will I be medically retired?
    #3A - What will my retirement pay be based on? High 3? Final pay?

    #4 - Any other advice or comments about MEB? Should I go to TAPS just to be safe?

    Thanks.

    #4 -

  4. 06-09-2014, 03:43 PM#4

  5. 06-10-2014, 03:06 PM#5
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    Well you are officially no longer world-wide deployable, but if your case is mild and controlled you have a decent chance of staying in. Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis are both very prone to getting people medically discharged though.
    Originally Posted by fufu

  6. 06-12-2014, 11:11 AM#6
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    Can you do a full PT test at any time (serious question) and run a bake sale (trolling)?

    Also on a serious note - how many medical opinions do you have backing up this diagnosis? If just one, seek out another.

  7. 06-12-2014, 12:21 PM#7
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    "Never force a fart in Djibouti"..."Always marry your second wife first"..."If anyone says that you're not a team player, maybe they're on the wrong team"..."You can gold plate a turd and it's still a turd"
    Fufu,
    Sorry to hear about the diagnosis. Yes get a second opinion, especially on treatment or "maintenance" options. My questions would be how does this affect you in your current AFSC? Are there deployment or assignment limitations? Some conditions (such as Sleep Apnea) generate an automatic MEB which basically returns a "duty limitation" that includes certain requirements for deployed locations as an example.

    On a personal side, consider you have only one body and one life (in that body). While the MEB and facing possible discharge earlier than you planned is stressful, what is best for you? Does the stresses/activities of your duties make it worse for you or no impact?

    I hope the end result is what's best for you and your family.

    Best wishes,
    Chief

  8. 06-17-2014, 01:32 AM#8
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    Originally Posted by Capt Alfredo
    Rules for the sake of rules makes for mindless policy and engenders a lack of respect for those who enact and enforce them.
    So, I actually have Ulcerative Colitis...but many people don't know what that is...so I say Crohns...seems more people understand that.

    Anyway, I'm on a PT profile, but for a issue not related to UC. However, I've been on/off PT Profile for quite some time. This started in 2011. I've gained 35lbs since this started and my PT scores have been dropping each year.

    I have one medical opinion backing this diagnosis. But, Ive seen the camera shots, from my colonoscopy, myself. I've also got Gastroparesis. The GI doctor has switched my meds about 3x since the diagnosis in April. Last week, I was put on 2 more medications: antibiotic and steroid. Also, b/c of the internal bleeding I become anemic.

    This whole thing really sucks. But, that said.... I can do my job. I'm a desk jockey and don't have any issues performing my job. My assignment to Turkey was just cancelled b/c I couldn't get the medical clearance to go. I've been at Base X 9 yrs and was looking forward to leaving.

    My PCM's opinion is that the AF will give me duty limitations and I will remain on AD. However, deployed locations/PCS locations might be limited.

    My wife and I are discussing taking the TERA next year, if offered again. I think it would be the best thing for me and my family. Its not secret that I'm not happy being in the AF. But, I just crossed 15 yrs in May. I don't like the % given for the early retirement, but if I feel like I will be discriminated against b/c of my condition. I appear physically healthy, but my insides are a mess. Appearance is everything in the AF.
    Originally Posted by Drackore
    Can you do a full PT test at any time (serious question) and run a bake sale (trolling)?

    Also on a serious note - how many medical opinions do you have backing up this diagnosis? If just one, seek out another.
    Originally Posted by Chief_KO
    Fufu,
    Sorry to hear about the diagnosis. Yes get a second opinion, especially on treatment or "maintenance" options. My questions would be how does this affect you in your current AFSC? Are there deployment or assignment limitations? Some conditions (such as Sleep Apnea) generate an automatic MEB which basically returns a "duty limitation" that includes certain requirements for deployed locations as an example.

    On a personal side, consider you have only one body and one life (in that body). While the MEB and facing possible discharge earlier than you planned is stressful, what is best for you? Does the stresses/activities of your duties make it worse for you or no impact?

    I hope the end result is what's best for you and your family.

    Best wishes,
    Chief

  9. 06-18-2014, 05:37 AM#9
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    What type of discrimination are you worried about or anticipate facing? I can see peoples attitudes possibly being an issue but the AF won't discriminate against you, and there are avenues to deal with discrimination if you face it. If the AF deems you fit to continue your service, then do so if you wish. People who may have an issue will have to deal with it or take it up with their chain, AFPC, etc.; it's their issue not yours. Bottom line, do whats best for you and your family/what makes you happy. Also keep in mind that if you are returned to duty and stay until retirement, your condition may have a positive affect on your retirement.

    I retired in '11 and went through a MEB in '07. The result of the MEB was that I was returned to duty with an Assignment Limitation Code of C-2, non worldwide qualified, and no limitations/profile for the PT test. (AFI 41-210, paragraph 4.76. gives an explanation/overview of the 3 codes.) Your PCM is correct in saying that deployed/PCS locations may be limited. Per the AFI, the codes don't limit deployed and/or overseas assignments, but are designed to ensure members with medical conditions are assigned and/or deployed to the appropriate location where care is available.
    Originally Posted by fufu
    I don't like the % given for the early retirement, but if I feel like I will be discriminated against b/c of my condition. I appear physically healthy, but my insides are a mess. Appearance is everything in the AF.

  10. 06-18-2014, 05:38 AM#10
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    What type of discrimination are you worried about or anticipate facing? I can see peoples attitudes possibly being an issue but the AF won't discriminate against you, and there are avenues to deal with discrimination if you face it. If the AF deems you fit to continue your service, then do so if you wish. People who may have an issue will have to deal with it or take it up with their chain, AFPC, etc.; it's their issue not yours. Bottom line, do whats best for you and your family/what makes you happy. Also keep in mind that if you are returned to duty and stay until retirement, your condition may have a positive affect on your retirement.

    I retired in '11 and went through a MEB in '07. The result of the MEB was that I was returned to duty with an Assignment Limitation Code of C-2, non worldwide qualified, and no limitations/profile for the PT test. (AFI 41-210, paragraph 4.76. gives an explanation/overview of the 3 codes.) Your PCM is correct in saying that deployed/PCS locations may be limited. Per the AFI, the codes don't limit deployed and/or overseas assignments, but are designed to ensure members with medical conditions are assigned and/or deployed to the appropriate location where care is available.

    Originally Posted by fufu
    I don't like the % given for the early retirement, but if I feel like I will be discriminated against b/c of my condition. I appear physically healthy, but my insides are a mess. Appearance is everything in the AF.

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